Google has another Nexus tablet, and it is made by HTC. The Taiwanese gadget creator has invested sooner or later far from building tablets, so this return is huge not simply on the grounds that it is a Nexus, one of Google’s steady of gadgets favored with stock Android (and the first to ship with Android 5.0 Lollipop), but also because it is a tablet from a company which has manufactured the best android Smartphone around, HTC One M8.

Design: Simple & Elegant

The configuration of the HTC Nexus 9 is in accordance with that of the Nexus 7 it replaces. The gadget features an all-dark front and a back that is ruled by an expansive Nexus logo.

The construct quality is perfect. The metal edge look incredible, as well as it gives additional unbending nature and further guarantees the client that this is a top notch item.

Display: Enough to Pop Your Eyes

The previously stated angle touches base on a Nexus tablet shockingly – it sets the HTC slate solidly against the iPad crew.

With pixel thickness of 281ppi, the screen of the Nexus 9 is more honed than the 9.7″ Retina of the iPad Air 2 (264ppi), which has the same resolution

Obviously from a top of the line IPS unit, the screen offers pleasingly natural colors, better viewing angles, and high splendor for any situation.

Controls: Never So Easy

Over the display in picture mode, you will discover the 1.6mp front-confronting cam and one of the Boomsound stereo speakers. The other one sits underneath the display.

There is nothing on the left half of the tablet. The force/lock key, a mouthpiece pinhole, and the volume rocker sit on the right side.

The 3.5mm sound jack sits on top of the tablet. The micro USB port and a little amplifier pinhole are on the bottom.

The once more of the gadget features a 8mp principle cam and its single-LED blaze – they are spotted in the upper left corner. The mark Nexus logo is there as well, joined by a little HTC emblem.

Battery: Made to Last

The HTC Nexus 9 features a powerful 6,700mah battery. The tablet is cited at up to 9.5 hours of Wi-Fi skimming, the same measure of time in video playback, and up to 30 days of Wi-Fi standby.